CSC ServiceWorks

CSC ServiceWorks is the leading provider of commercial laundry services and air vending solutions throughout the United States, Canada, and Europe.

Technology Staffing Services
Consumer Services
3,000+
Headquarters
Plainview, NY
we have
jobs
Opportunities
Consumer Services

The Career You Want

The Life You've Earned.

It Works.

You bring the ambition. We'll provide the path to success. Your vision for your next mission works here at CSC ServiceWorks. From entry level through senior level, we welcome those that share our customer focus, spirit of collaboration, and high-level of integrity. Our diverse range of career paths represents many walks of life, but we all share one thing in common—our mutual goal of building something great.

At CSC, we're in the business of making things work, for our team members, our clients, and our consumers. As the industry leader, we can offer military personnel and their spouses the opportunity to have both, a great career and a great life. We believe hard work and accountability should be rewarded, career growth should be supported, and that you should be able to have the flexibility and time to enjoy what matters most.

As a member of the military, or spouse, your loyalty, work ethic, leadership, and teamwork is valued and appreciated here. Join our best-in-class team and we'll provide the training, support, and tools so you can excel in your career, gain new skills, and feel fulfilled knowing your work makes everyday life easier for our customers and consumers.

You've given so much already to our country. Let us give back to you by investing in your future. Be part of what works within our CSC family and yours.

The CSC ServiceWorks Story

We're the leading provider of commercial laundry and air vending solutions across North America and Europe. A team of 3,000+ professionals, we work collaboratively and diligently to provide excellent service and machines that work reliably for consumers. As a part of the CSC family, we have access to career opportunities, training, and benefits that help us achieve our goals in work and life.

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Meet our veterans

Tyler

Area Sales Manager
U.S. Army - Staff Sergeant, Psychological Operations
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Annette

National Account Sales Support
U.S. Air Force & MN Air National Guard - Senior Master Sergeant, Logistics Supply Technician & Squadron First Sergeant
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Annette
National Account Sales Support
U.S. Air Force & MN Air National Guard - Senior Master Sergeant, Logistics Supply Technician & Squadron First Sergeant
About
Annette

I have been working with the Air National Accounts since I started in November 2005 with AIR-serv. My team is the day-to-day contact between our company and our national accounts. Since we are responsible for reporting information to either side, it is important to understand the work and flow of many different departments. Attention to detail is key! I learned this early on when I first joined the military when I was 19. Whether you are prepping your uniform to be worn, paperwork to be processed, or passing along pertinent information to your team, correct and timely data is imperative to a successful mission. I spent 22 years in the military, full-time active duty Air Force for 6 years, and 16 years in the MN Air National Guard. Having gone on many trips and two war-time deployments, my day-to-day understanding of how the work, the mission and the importance of team cohesiveness is a valued asset.

Annette
's Advice

There are three things I communicate to transitioning service members:

The first piece of advice I give to transitioning service members is that they have to understand and recognize that while they may have learned a skill set in the military they are most likely going to be the civilian equivalent of nothing relative to their respective MOS. A lot of the people I talk to are looking for the civilian equivalent work or position that they did in the military in their civilian transition.

They are going to struggle to find that. The service is a completely different world with its own culture, rules and objectives.

I was a Combat Medic in the Army. I received some very specialized and advanced training relative to my MOS, which served me remarkably well in the military; however, almost none of the things that I was trained and allowed to do in the military would I be allowed to do in an equivalent position in the civilian world.

It's almost like starting over. That is not a negative thing though; it is an absolute positive.

The reason for that is because what service members do bring to the table that other applicants will not have is the demonstrated ability to multi-task, perform tasks under pressure, meet deadlines, follow and give clear instructions and most importantly, work effectively within a diverse team of people that have varying degrees of backgrounds and skill sets to collaboratively meet an objective or goal. The service teaches you to be both a sheep (a follower) and a shepherd (a leader) and be comfortable and great at being both.

Embrace that and communicate your ability to do both to prospective employers.

The second piece of advice that I give transitioning service members is that as obvious as it may be, when they do land a position in the civilian world, they are no longer in the military. People are not always going to do something simply because you outrank them or because you said so. In the military you get used to following orders and instructions without question. Civilian life is nowhere near that. To be absolutely honest, I had to learn to listen more and I had to learn to be open to other people's point of views because none of the decisions I was making were life and death, so I had time to gather more information and make an informed, educated and collaborative decision.

That process has allowed me to be a more engaged and successful leader in the civilian world.

The third piece of advice I give is to take advantage of the GI Bill. I used it to get my Master's Degree. It will not be easy to find the time to get this done with work and family but it is absolutely worth it. It will open doors for you that you will not have access to without it and will allow you to progress in whichever field you choose.

Michael

Branch Manager
U.S. Army - Sergeant, Combat Medic
Read More
Michael
Branch Manager
U.S. Army - Sergeant, Combat Medic
About
Michael

I work for a company that provides, sells, services, installs and collects laundry and air machines to customers (apartments, colleges, gas stations etc..) who have a need for laundry and/or air machines in their buildings or facilities. As the Branch Manager, I lead and manage a team of 65 people who work out of warehouses in Denver, CO; Salt Lake City, UT; Grand Junction, CO; and Rapid City, SD. What I consider to be the most important aspect of my day-to-day responsibilities is keeping the team engaged, focused and consistent with the delivery of the services we provide to all of our customers. It is important that everyone knows and understands their role within the organization. It is critical that they work together and know that because their efforts overlap into each other's work centers their productivity, attention to detail and excellence and subsequent result will have an impact on how the people in other areas are viewed in the eyes of our customers and how the company ultimately performs. Implementing structure, organization, accountability and discipline into our day-to-day operations allows us to meet our goals of delivering a consistently excellent product and service to our customers. The aspect of this position I enjoy the most is working with an excited and engaged team. I have found that having a clear picture of who we are as a business, a vision on where we are going and what we plan on doing to get there allows everyone here to come into work with a clear direction. My job is to make sure we never lose focus of the goal and always work towards getting there together.

Michael
's Advice

There are three things I communicate to transitioning service members:

The first piece of advice I give to transitioning service members is that they have to understand and recognize that while they may have learned a skill set in the military they are most likely going to be the civilian equivalent of nothing relative to their respective MOS. A lot of the people I talk to are looking for the civilian equivalent work or position that they did in the military in their civilian transition.

They are going to struggle to find that. The service is a completely different world with its own culture, rules and objectives.

I was a Combat Medic in the Army. I received some very specialized and advanced training relative to my MOS, which served me remarkably well in the military; however, almost none of the things that I was trained and allowed to do in the military would I be allowed to do in an equivalent position in the civilian world.

It's almost like starting over. That is not a negative thing though; it is an absolute positive.

The reason for that is because what service members do bring to the table that other applicants will not have is the demonstrated ability to multi-task, perform tasks under pressure, meet deadlines, follow and give clear instructions and most importantly, work effectively within a diverse team of people that have varying degrees of backgrounds and skill sets to collaboratively meet an objective or goal. The service teaches you to be both a sheep (a follower) and a shepherd (a leader) and be comfortable and great at being both.

Embrace that and communicate your ability to do both to prospective employers.

The second piece of advice that I give transitioning service members is that as obvious as it may be, when they do land a position in the civilian world, they are no longer in the military. People are not always going to do something simply because you outrank them or because you said so. In the military you get used to following orders and instructions without question. Civilian life is nowhere near that. To be absolutely honest, I had to learn to listen more and I had to learn to be open to other people's point of views because none of the decisions I was making were life and death, so I had time to gather more information and make an informed, educated and collaborative decision.

That process has allowed me to be a more engaged and successful leader in the civilian world.

The third piece of advice I give is to take advantage of the GI Bill. I used it to get my Master's Degree. It will not be easy to find the time to get this done with work and family but it is absolutely worth it. It will open doors for you that you will not have access to without it and will allow you to progress in whichever field you choose.

About
's Advice
About
's Advice