Visa

As a global company at the forefront of the electronic payments industry, Visa is a dynamic organization.

Finance
employees
11300
strong
Headquarters
Foster City, CA
we have
jobs
Opportunities
Finance

Visa salutes you.

At Visa, we have deep admiration for your military service. Your courage, integrity and leadership are highly respected. Not to mention your ability to work under pressure, your discipline and your incredible sense of urgency—qualities inherent to your military experience. We thank you for your service and sacrifice and we hope you'll consider joining the Visa team.

Visa is transforming the way the world pays and creating new possibilities for people around the globe—and that includes you. High performance is celebrated and recognized here and you can help shape a global success story. We want you to be a part of our team of innovative and trustworthy achievers. Your unique perspective and experience could open up unlimited opportunity and lead to a rewarding career with us.

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Meet our veterans

Kim

Director, Merchant Services
U.S. Air Force - Chief Master Sergeant, Medical
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Brian

Vice President, Global Lead Data Center Engineering & Operations
U.S. Navy - Lieutenant, Surface Warfare Officer
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Brian
Vice President, Global Lead Data Center Engineering & Operations
U.S. Navy - Lieutenant, Surface Warfare Officer
About
Brian

I lead a team of Data Center professionals to ensure we provide secure and reliable critical infrastructure that supports all of our financial transaction technology. Our diligence assures we provide 7x24x365 availability for all Visa transactions.

Dedication to the mission is the bedrock in our day-to-day activities. If our team fails to do our job, then the rest of Visa's Technology platform will fail. Principles of honesty, integrity, shared responsibility, and teamwork ensure we accomplish our Mission. Leadership focus on family, health and personal development enables work-life integration. One of the first lessons I learned as a Plebe at the Naval Academy, was that “Men {People} mean more than guns in the rating of a ship…” It does not matter how much advanced technology or tools you have, it is not the most important factor in your organization. People and our ability to lead them matters most. Ultimately, leadership will be your value proposition to the organization.

Most of my team's days are spent planning and executing maintenance in our critical infrastructure as well as reviewing procedures and long range planning. We must constantly view the world from the prism of a tactical and strategic view simultaneously. Because we provide constant availability, we need to do whatever it takes, to ensure critical electricity and cooling are always available to support ongoing financial transactions. Despite this requirement, we cannot make short-term convenient decisions and compromise our future. We must always anticipate what may happen in the future and learn to see around corners for unforeseen threats to availability.

Brian
's Advice

The average squad or team leader is used to shouldering more responsibility than your civilian peers. You understand that leadership is more than telling people what to do during work hours. Most of you have led men and women during tough times, you have been responsible for their families, and you know how critical it is to learn what makes each member of your team tick. This is highly valued in the business world. Figure out how to explain this to a hiring manager in terms they will understand and appreciate. Use your military network to gain a perspective on how your responsibilities translates into the civilian world. You are not the first to walk this road, so use the knowledge of those who went ahead of you. Research and reach out to the associations and industry groups who specialize in the industries and sectors in which you have an interest. Use those to build your knowledge base and grow your contact groups.

Make use on base and non-profit resources that specialize in helping you translate your military qualifications into civilian qualifications. Edit, re-write, and rehearse your resume and interview answers with someone who does not know what you do in the military. Continue to do this until you can get through the entire series without them asking, “What do you mean by that?” or “What does that term mean?”

Michael

Team Lead, Global Sourcing Operations
U.S. Army - Captain, Military Police Officer
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Michael
Team Lead, Global Sourcing Operations
U.S. Army - Captain, Military Police Officer
About
Michael

I lead the Operations Team for Visa's Global Sourcing group. We support the systems, policies, and procedures that are foundational to procurement, sourcing, and contracting at Visa. A core part of my team's mission is to make the purchasing experience as easy and simple as possible and be a force multiplier for the souring teams.

This means we are always challenging how Visa purchases and looking for ways to make it simpler, better, and faster. We do this by actively soliciting feedback about the purchasing experience, developing our stakeholder relationships, seeking input on improvement ideas, and measuring performance to track accomplishment of our goals.

It is a dynamic, ever-changing environment that is well suited for those who are used to constant change.

Michael
's Advice

The average squad or team leader is used to shouldering more responsibility than your civilian peers. You understand that leadership is more than telling people what to do during work hours. Most of you have led men and women during tough times, you have been responsible for their families, and you know how critical it is to learn what makes each member of your team tick. This is highly valued in the business world. Figure out how to explain this to a hiring manager in terms they will understand and appreciate. Use your military network to gain a perspective on how your responsibilities translates into the civilian world. You are not the first to walk this road, so use the knowledge of those who went ahead of you. Research and reach out to the associations and industry groups who specialize in the industries and sectors in which you have an interest. Use those to build your knowledge base and grow your contact groups.

Make use on base and non-profit resources that specialize in helping you translate your military qualifications into civilian qualifications. Edit, re-write, and rehearse your resume and interview answers with someone who does not know what you do in the military. Continue to do this until you can get through the entire series without them asking, “What do you mean by that?” or “What does that term mean?”

About
's Advice
About
's Advice